Fascinating article on the power and mobility of decentralized networks

This was on NPR just today. I loved reading about how an app  is being used by grassroots foot-to-ground movements to circumvent the loss of cell and Internet communication.  Chinese gvmt  still has much to learn about the principles of starfish vs spider entities.  This book (The Starfish and the Spider) by Ori Brafman has similar stories in it of monolithic entities failing to snuff out decentralized networks.  The immediate example I thought of was the music industry taking out Napster’s central server but being unable to shut down Kazaa because it functioned like fire chat below — making each computer into a mini-server.  You can take it out, but you never take out a central server.

Why does something like this even matter?  Because for multiplication to happen, we have to stop thinking about centralization — even with the control it affords us.  Decentralization gives a strength, durability, efficiency, and mobility that is difficult to stop.

How Hong Kong Protesters Are Connecting, Without Cell Or Wi-Fi Networks
by ELISE HU
September 29, 201412:57 PM ET

As throngs of pro-democracy protesters continue to organize in Hong Kong’s central business district, many of them are messaging one another through a network that doesn’t require cell towers or Wi-Fi nodes. They’re using an app called FireChat that launched in March and is underpinned by mesh networking, which lets phones unite to form a temporary Internet.

So far, mesh networks have proven themselves quite effective and quickly adopted during times of disaster or political unrest, as they don’t rely on existing cable and wireless networks. In Iraq, tens of thousands of people have downloaded FireChat as the government limits connectivity in an effort to curb ISIS communications. Protesters in Taiwan this spring turned to FireChat when cell signals were too weak and at times nonexistent.

And FireChat’s popularity is surging in Hong Kong. About 100,000 users downloaded the free FireChat app between Sunday morning and Monday morning, according to The Wall Street Journal. While there are no reports of cell-network outages so far, student leaders are recommending FireChat for fear authorities may shut off communications.

Gizmodo explains why mesh networks can be critical during tense showdowns with governments:

“Mesh networks are an especially resilient tool because there’s no easy way for a government to shut them down. They can’t just block cell reception or a site address. Mesh networks are like Voldemort after he split his soul into horcruxes (only not evil). Destroying one part won’t kill it unless you destroy each point of access; someone would have to turn off Bluetooth on every phone using FireChat to completely break the connection. This hard-to-break connection isn’t super important for casual chats, but during tense political showdowns, it could be a lifeline.”
And as we have previously reported, Open Garden, the company that made FireChat and an Android mesh networking app also called Open Garden, has bigger ambitions for mesh networking:

Protesters take pictures with their mobile phones on Monday as they block the main street to the financial Central district, outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong.

Protesters march as they block the main street to the financial Central district, outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong, on Monday. Protesters at times numbering in the tens of thousands have gathered to demand the right to choose the territory’s next leaders.

If mesh networks take off, they could challenge reliance on cellular data or existing wireless for Internet.

“Once you build a mesh network … now you have a network that is resilient, self-healing, cannot be controlled by any central organization, cannot be shut down and is always working,” Christophe Daligault, Open Garden’s vice president for sales and marketing says. “I think that solves many other drawbacks or challenges of the mobile broadband Internet today.”
He says none of this would be possible without the rapid spread of smartphones, because that means no extra hardware is needed.

“Each [phone] becomes a router and in a sense you’re growing the Internet — everyone who joins the mesh network creates an extension of the Internet,” Daligault says. “In a year or two from now, I think people won’t even remember that you had to be on Wi-Fi or get a cell signal to be able to communicate.”

Leave a Reply

  

  

  

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>